Saturday, December 28, 2013

Stain-free Apparel











 

Image credit: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-2525274/Student-invents-Silic-T-shirt-thats-impossible-stain.html 

San Fransisco-based student Aamir Patel has created a wearable material that can resist any spills and splashes including Coca-Cola, tomato ketchup, mustard, milkshakes, beer, ink and even red wine. 

The clothing has billions of silica particles bonded to the fibers. Water-based liquids form a 150-degree sphere on this material and roll off. 

Also, the shirts can't be washed with fabric softener and need to be put in a tumble dryer on a low heat after every three washes. No bleaching or washing with colors and no ironing. No dry cleaning too. 

The business student had started a page about the invention, named Silic, on crowdfunding website Kickstarter. He has already exceeded his target of about $20,000 (£12,250), before the campaign closes on January 26, 2014. 

The apparel is to be priced at £30 and it is expected to be on sale online from May 2014.

It’s good to know that the Church is standing up to the likes of Jais! Catholic churches in Selangor will continue to use the “Allah” word during its weekend services in Malay despite the state’s Islamic Religious Department (Jais) intention to send them reminders on a 1988 state enactment prohibiting non-Muslims from using the word. 

Catholic weekly Herald editor Rev Father Lawrence Andrew said Article 11(3) (A) of the Federal Constitution prescribes that every religious group has its right to manage its own religious affairs. 

“Our religion cannot be managed by any Muslim group. It is against the Federal Constitution.” He told The Malaysian Insider yesterday: "We will continue to use the word ‘Allah’ in our masses.” 

And he added, “At the moment, the case is still in court and no decision has been made yet. They can’t preempt this.” 

Aside from the Catholic church, other Christian churches, such as the Sidang Injil Borneo, also conduct services in Malay and other native languages from East Malaysia, and using the “Allah” word.

No comments: