Saturday, April 22, 2017

Quota Policy Insults the Malays














Image credit: https://hornbillunleashed.wordpress.com/2010/09/27/10014/

On Wednesday, Khairy Jamaluddin showed his hypocrisy when he spoke to Indian youths at a dialogue session.
 
The Youth and Sports Minister had agreed with a participant who questioned the quota policy favoring Malay students for university places.
 
“We should start seeing this quota (system) as something that is a bit insulting, that we need a quota to get somewhere”, Khairy said.
 
“Just as there is a perception of discrimination amongst other communities, we also feel that maybe we are not that good, because other communities are saying that, ‘Hey, you are here only because of the quota’”, he continued.
 
“I want the Malay community to compete on a level playing field”, he emphasized.
 
You and I know that he didn’t mean it at all. He was just trying to make himself look good in front of a non-Malay audience. He wouldn’t dare say it in front of his UMNO crowd! 
 
Besides, it is not just about university places but it involves also entry into the civil service, housing, qualification for small business loans and corporate equity.
 
Ibrahim Ali from Malay pressure group Perkasa promptly rebuked Khairy, saying that the UMNO Youth leader should resign if he thinks the government’s quota policy is an insult to the Malay community.
 
Just one day after Khairy’s remarks, the Perkasa president said the quota system was provided for in the Federal Constitution, and that abolishing the said policy would undermine national security.
 
And he alluded that if it happens, there will be violence. He warned: “It will create extremism, terrorism, if they are not treated well”.
 
Today, an UMNO Supreme Council member rejected any suggestion that the quota system is insulting to the Malay community. According to Sohaimi Shahadan, as reported by Malay daily Sinar Harian, he declared that “as ‘masters’ on our own land, Bumiputeras or Malays indeed deserves to enjoy the privileges at all times…”
 
What started as a means to supposedly address social disparity among the Malays and the non-Malays has now turned into a sacred right for one segment of the population. This is Malaysia.

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